Apprenticeship

16Nov 2017

On October 23, 2017, OSHA began full enforcement of the respirable crystalline silica (RCS) standard for construction (29 CFR 1926.1153).  To comply with this standard we should make sure to:

  • Get to know the Standard inside and out.  Silica Standard Compliance Guide
  • Implement the controls required of Table 1 activities.
  • Have a written Silica Exposure Control Plan (ECP) and other relevant safety programs (Respiratory Protection Program, Hazardous Communication Program, etc.)
  • Assign a Competent Person on each job site. (OSHA defines a competent person as someone who accepts the responsibility, has the training, and has the authority to make needed changes to ensure safety.)
  • When Doing Table 1 activities without the suggested controls, the scheduled monitoring option will have to be implemented. (Personal breathing zone samples will have to be taken to ensure that the RCS exposure level is below the action level.)
  • When doing work outside the scope of Table 1 activities, we can use the scheduled monitoring option (personal breathing zone sample will be taken) or the Performance monitoring option can be implemented (sample data from an outside source can be used as long as it was from the same work using the same materials.) When using data from outside source, have a copy on hand for occasions when we might be asked why we are not doing our own tests.
  • When sweeping floors or dusting something off, we need to use sweeping compound and/or a vacuum with HEPA filtration.
  • We need to make annual medical evaluations available to employees who wear or will be wearing a respirator for 30 or more in a year. (This applies per employer. Exposures from previous employers do not count towards 30 days)

New Drywall applications are exempt from this new standard because current gypsum panels and joint compounds now contain little or no RCS. Although we still need to keep an eye on the SDS on all products we use to ensure silica exposure will not reach the action level.  Keep in mind if employees are disturbing old drywall, old plaster, or any other material other than new drywall panels or new joint compound, there will be an elevated risk.  So pre-job existing material sampling and/or personal breathing zone sample may need to be taken.

Even though Drywall work is exempt, that doesn’t mean that there won’t be health threat from ingredients other than RCS.  We should set strict companies policies that set rules for required PPE and Engineering Controls for every task employees might be doing.  Some examples may be:  Closing off and limiting access to areas where drywall is being sanded, require 100% use of respiratory protection when any worker is in an area being sanded, and running air handlers/scrubbers in an area being sanded.

When it comes to glazing and glass work, remember, silica is a key ingredient in the manufacturing of glass.  The most severe exposures to crystalline silica result from abrasive blasting. This process is used to etch or frost glass. Additionally, crystalline silica exposure can occur in the maintenance, repair, and replacement of the linings of refractory brick furnaces, such as those used to manufacture glass. Most aspects of the glass trades will fall under Table 1 activities.  Be mindful when cutting, chipping, grinding, or drilling into concrete, brick, or mortar.

It is the intention of the D.C. 6 and the FTIOR to stay as up to date as possible on this standard and its possible implications on our work.  If we stay in constant communication and share our data as it comes out, we should have no problems staying in compliance.

28Oct 2017
  • Apprenticeship Graduation Celebration
  • Room is setup for the Apprenticeship Dinner on October 19, 2017
  • Purple Fall Mums room decoration apprenticeship graduation dinner
  • Welcome to the Apprenticeship Graduation
  • The Finishing Trade Institute of the Ohio Region Board of Directors Congratulates all the graduates
  • Apprenticeship graduation group photo
  • Ioannis Kleoudis (center) from Local 476 completed the Painter - CAS program
  • Drywall Finishers and Tapers from local 505 are all smiles at the graduation
  • Another look at our new Glaziers
  • Apprenticeship Graduation Cake

October 19, 2017 – Strongsville, Ohio: Twenty-three apprentices celebrated their graduation to journeyperson at a special dinner and diploma presentation on Thursday, October 19th at the Strongsville training center. The event, which was hosted by the Finishing Trade Institute of the Ohio Region (FTIOR), included Charlie Meadows, General President’s Representative from IUPAT as the guest speaker. District Council 6, Local 181 Glaziers, Local 505 Cleveland, Local 707 Cleveland, SCT, Sherwin-Williams, and Teresa R Pofok Company LPA sponsored the event.

Director of Training George Boots kicked off the evening, followed by DC6 Business Manager/Secretary/Treasurer and FTIOR Co-Chairman Jim Sherwood who congratulated the graduates on behalf of the FTIOR board of trustees, and the leadership team of DC6, “Good luck to all the graduating apprentices from District Council 6, you are the future of this union and this industry,” said Sherwood. After Charlie Meadows inspiring presentation, John Houlis, Matt Graff, Jason Liskai, Justin Oshel & Nick Papadorotheou recognized the graduates and presented them with their diplomas.

Director Timothy McCarthy and Patricia Pietrarois, Program Manager of Joint Apprenticeship Training advanced training center at Cuyahoga Community College presented special recognition certificates.

Apprentices who graduated that night:

Painter – Decorators
David Babinec (707)
Thomas Bussy (707)
Bret Conroy (707)
Zachary Hartman (7)
Joseph Kish (707)
Travis Olszewski (7)
Brian Owens (7)
Josea Uliano (707)
Jeremy Upton (7) Military Veteran
Dennise Williard (7)
Charlie Wright (476)

Glaziers
Gregory Glatzhofer (181)
David Oberacker (181)
Seth Ord (948)
Andrew Twardzik (1162)

Drywall Finishers & Tapers
Cody Bianca (505)
Eduardo Fonseca-Torres (505)
Alex Luenberger (505)
Robert Svagerko (505)

Painter – CAS
Ioannis Kleoudis (476)

Union apprenticeships with D.C. 6 are registered, certified and highly regarded career training programs that offer a combination of structured on-the-job training and related technical instruction to train potential trades workers in occupations that demand a high level of skill. D.C. 6 apprenticeships are administered by the cooperative labor-management Joint Apprenticeship Training Fund (J.A.T.F.).

Depending on the trades, apprenticeships can last from three to four years, during which time apprentices work and learn under the direction of experienced journey workers. Over time, apprentices are provided the diversity and complexity of training that leads to becoming highly skilled in their chosen occupations. As they gain skill, they are compensated through an increase in wages. Learn more about the many benefits of union membership and apprenticeship; fill out an information form